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Posts Tagged ‘Photography’

Travel inspires. When we think of Hungary, there are some images, colors, and symbols that come to mind. Let’s take a look at them now, starting with what’s happening with art in Hungary today, then going backwards to the basics and history.

Talent, Talent, Talent

There are many great artists, museums, places… one artist who really stands out is Soos Nora… Nora Soos. I love, love, love her work. So vibrant. Exciting. Different. Unique. And relevant. Here’s an example of a piece of work of hers that I love, but please check out her website for more.

soosnoraThe ACB Galeria has many contemporary artists, so take a look there for more options and let me know in the comments which you really enjoy.

(And for more museum information, check out my Budapest Travel guide, which I will make available on January 17)

Street Art

streetart(Photo by Diana Lili M)

Design Week

For five years and running, Design Week has centralized design talks, shops and community in Budapest. Here are some posters from the past, and a link to the website.

designweekpostersI think I would want to be a part of this, though probably only as a spectator.

Photography

Andre Kertesz, to quote the ever-reliable wikipedia, “was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and by his efforts in establishing and developing the photo essay.” I’ve dabbled in photography myself and think his work is timeless. To think that he came up with these ideas years ago, and I can’t even be that imaginative today!

andre

Scan courtesy of Masters of Photography

Folk Art

Hungary has a strong embroidery, ceramic, porcelain, wood, and carpet folk art industry. The Folk Art Centrum is a great place to get an example of what Hungary is known for.

folk-art(Images from Hungarian Folk Art)

Find out information about purchasing Hungarian Folk Art online.

Hungarian Folk Art has been connected (and disconnected) to the patriotism of the country, used, when needed, as a form of propaganda. After World War I, folk art campaigns were arranged to encourage national pride. Folk art was vital to the people. While under communism, folk art took on a separate role: a way for the youth to identify with their own history and rebel against the government’s art suggestions. Unexpectedly, the Soviet Union supported the folk art revival since it was a truly “from the people”. As folk art gained in popularity, the people started to retreat. Folk art shifted in significance from how people identified themselves, to how Hungarians USED to identify. As folk art began to be viewed as a way of the past, Western art and ideas gained in popularity. (Source: Beyond Multicultural Art Education)

The Flag

The Hungarian Flag is Red (strength), White (faithfulness) and Green (hope).  The flag has an interesting history, which you can find here.

Now what…

I’m going to use some of the above inspiration, the book I’m reading, the movie I’m going to watch, previous posts and upcoming posts to create a souvenir of our trip to Budapest. I will post my souvenir in one week. If this information inspires you in any way, I would love to see what you create!

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